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Balkrishna Pandey
Balkrishna Pandey

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The Complete Guide on GitOps: What Is It and How Can You Use It?

What is GitOps?

GitOps is a relatively new term that you may have been hearing lately. But what does it mean, and more importantly, how can you use it? GitOps is a new way of managing your systems using the power of Git. It takes the concepts of version control and applies them to system management.

GitOps, if you break it down, is composed of two words, Git (a distributed open-source version control system) and Ops (Operation), is a set of practices to manage your day-to-day operational processes. In GitOps, Git is a single source of truth of your declarative infrastructure and applications state. The framework takes the best practices proven in the application development process, such as version control, team collaboration, security and government compliance, CI/CD process, and automates your network configuration, policies, entire Infrastructure, application configuration, etc. The basic idea is to not apply any manual changes to your Infrastructure; every change you make should go through the git workflow. So to summarize, GitOps is an infrastructure as code (IaC) solution that includes version control to store the state, pull requests for change management, and continuous integration and deployment for change rollout.

GitOps is all about automating your system management. Using Git, you can track changes to your system and easily roll back any changes that may cause problems. It allows you to manage your systems more effectively and with less downtime. GitOps also enables you to manage your systems from a single place. It can be a huge benefit when you have multiple systems to manage. With GitOps, you can easily track and manage all of your systems from a single repository.

If you’re interested in learning more about GitOps, this blog post is for you! We’ll discuss what GitOps is and how it can benefit you. We’ll also show you how to get started with GitOps today. So let’s get started!

GitOps Principles

There are a few principles that are key to understanding GitOps:

  1. The single source of truth is Git.
  2. Everything is code, from systems to applications.
  3. Changes go through a pull request workflow.
  4. CI/CD and controller/operators are used to rollout changes.

These principles are crucial to understanding how GitOps works. Let’s take a closer look at each one.

The single source of truth is Git: In GitOps, the single source of truth is Git. Everything in your system is stored in Git and tracked by Git. It includes your systems, applications, configurations, and more. It allows you to easily track all changes to your system and roll back any changes that may cause problems.

Everything is code, from systems to applications: In GitOps, everything is code. Your systems and applications are treated the same as any other codebase. It allows you to manage your systems and applications using the same tools and processes for your codebase. It also enables you to use version control to store the state of your systems and applications. Furthermore, we may take advantage of Git’s security features to verify the code’s ownership and provenance.

Changes go through a pull request workflow : In GitOps, all changes must go through a pull request workflow. It ensures that all changes are controlled and can be tested adequately before being rolled out. It also enables you to track and manage all changes to your system quickly. Furthermore, you don’t have to disclose your cluster credentials to anybody; the person making the update requires access to the Git repository only.

CI/CD and Controller/Operators are used for change rollout: In GitOps, continuous integration and deployment (CI/CD) and Controller/Operators are used. The controller assures there are no configuration drifts since the desired system state is already stored in Git; if the states vary, the program should be able to self-heal or alert the user of the drift based on its settings. CI/CD and controller model also ensure that all changes are tested before rolling out to your systems. It helps to ensure that all changes are safe and cause minimal disruption to your systems.

Benefits of GitOps approach

These days, applications are becoming increasingly complicated. They’ve been designed with speed and size in mind. Applications are divided into smaller components called microservices, where theoretically, you should be able to scale, deploy, manage and replace individual microservices without affecting others. Infrastructure components and operation processes are also becoming increasingly complex to support the complexity of the application. If you have a well-established process, you should be able to deploy and maintain your application multiple times a day. This is where the GitOps process comes in handy.

There are many benefits to using the GitOps approach to system management. Some of the key benefits include:

  • Automation: By using Git, you can automate your system management. It includes tasks such as provisioning, configuring, and deploying your systems.
  • Improved reliability & stability: As your system is managed using code, you can easily track and roll back any changes that may cause problems.
  • Reduced Downtime: You can reduce downtime by tracking changes to your system and quickly rolling back any changes that may cause problems.
  • Single Place for Management: With GitOps, you can manage all of your systems from a single place. It can be a huge benefit when you have multiple systems to manage.
  • Ease of infrastructure management: As your Infrastructure is stored in code, you can manage it easily using the same tools for managing your code. It includes version control, issue tracking, and code review.
  • Improved security: Using GitOps, you can ensure that only approved changes are made to your systems. It can help to enhance security and compliance.
  • Audit Trail: As all changes are tracked and stored in Git, you can easily audit any changes that have been made to your systems. It helps us to answer questions like who is making changes? What changes are made? And at what point in time are changes made?

GitOps workflow

The GitOps workflow is based on the principle of “infrastructure as code.” All of your infrastructures are stored in code and versioned using Git. Any changes to your Infrastructure are made through pull requests. Once a pull request is approved, the changes are deployed automatically to your production environment.

To get started with GitOps, you will need a Git repository where your infrastructure code is stored. It can be a private or public repository depending on the nature of the application. Once the repository is ready, the overall flow looks like this,

  • Define your Infrastructure as code; you can use tools and technology to achieve this. Examples include Ansible, Terraform, container, Kubernetes, openshift, Fluxcd, Argocd, etc.
  • You commit your changes to a Git repository.
  • A pull request is created and sent for review.
  • Another team member can then review and examine the code before authorization, triggering the CI/CD process. After then, the pipeline will notify the Git Operator, who will take up all of the changes and the intended new state.
  • After then, the Git operator will compare the current state of the Infrastructure to the desired state. This process assures that the Infrastructure’s desired and observed states are the same; if not, it will try to reconcile.

Push-based vs. Pull-based Deployments

Now that we have a basic understanding of GitOps, let’s look at the two different types of deployments, push-based and pull-based.

Push-based deployments : With push-based deployments, changes are made on a centralized server and then pushed out to all clients. This type of deployment is often used in traditional IT environments.

Pull-based deployments : With pull-based deployments, changes are made on the client machines and then pulled down to the server. This type of deployment is often used in modern DevOps environments.

There are pros and cons to both types of deployments. Let’s take a look at some of them.

Push-Based Deployments:

Pros:

centrally managed; changes are pushed out to all clients

Cons:

changes can take time to propagate; often difficult to track changes or rollback

Pull-Based Deployments:

Pros:

changes are made on the client machines, which can speed up the process; easy to follow changes or rollback

Cons:

Changes must be made on all client machines; it can be more challenging to manage if there are many clients.

So, which type of deployment is best for you? That depends on your specific environment and needs. However, in most cases, pull-based deployments are the preferred option. They are more agile and easier to manage than push-based deployments.

FAQs

Q: What is GitOps?

A: GitOps is a DevOps deployment strategy that uses Git as the source of truth. It helps ensure that the code is always in a known state and makes it easier to roll back changes if something goes wrong. Changes are made in Git and then pulled down to the production environment.

Q: What is the primary benefit of GitOps?

A: The primary benefit of GitOps is that it makes it easy to manage and replicate your Infrastructure as Code. It helps ensure that your Infrastructure is always in a known state and makes it easier to automate deployments. GitOps also enables you to adopt DevOps practices and improve communication and collaboration within your organization. It includes improved agility, easier management, and a clear audit trail of all changes.

Q: What are the two types of deployments?

A: There are two types of deployments: push-based and pull-based. Push-based deployments are when changes are pushed from the developer’s workstation to the production environment. Pull-based deployments are when the changes are pulled from the Git repository to the production environment.

Q: Which type of deployment is best for me?

A: That depends on your specific environment and needs. However, in most cases, pull-based deployments are the preferred option. They are more agile and easier to manage than push-based deployments.

Q: How to get secrets into the environment without storing them in Git?

A: You can use a secrets management tool such as Vault to store your secrets. This will help keep them safe and secure and out of Git.

Q: We are already doing DevOps. What’s the difference between GitOps?

A: GitOps is a specific DevOps deployment strategy that uses Git as the source of truth. It is different from other DevOps strategies in that it emphasizes using Git to manage changes rather than relying on manual processes or scripts.

Q: Can I use GitOps with my existing tools and processes?

A: Yes, you can use GitOps with your existing tools and processes. GitOps is flexible and can be tailored to fit your specific needs. You can continue to use your favorite tools and techniques while using Git to manage changes and automate deployments.

Q: What is a Git repository?

A: A Git repository is a storage location for your code and other project files. It can be local or remote, and it can be hosted on any platform. Git repositories are easy to set up and use, making them popular for developers.

Q: What is a Git branch?

A: A Git branch is a separate line of development for your code. It can be used to experiment with new features or to fix bugs. Branches are easy to create and manage, making them popular for developers.

Q: How do I create a Git branch?

A: To create a Git branch, open a terminal and run the following command: git branch name-of-new-branch. It will create a new branch called the name-of-new-branch.

Q: What is the difference between a Git repository and a Git branch?

A: A Git repository is a storage location for your code and other project files. It can be local or remote, and it can be hosted on any platform. A Git branch is a separate line of development for your code. It can be used to experiment with new features or to fix bugs. Branches are easy to create and manage, making them popular for developers.

Q: How do I switch to a different branch?

A: To switch to a different branch, open a terminal and run the following command: git checkout name-of-new-branch. It will switch to the branch called the name-of-new-branch.

Q: What is Declarative Infrastructure?

A: Declarative Infrastructure is a DevOps approach that uses code to define the Infrastructure. It helps ensure that the Infrastructure is always in a known state and makes it easier to manage and replicate. Declarative Infrastructure is popular with organizations that are moving to the cloud.

Q: What are the benefits of using Declarative Infrastructure?

A: The benefits of using Declarative Infrastructure include improved agility, easier management, and a clear audit trail of all changes. It is also popular with organizations that are moving to the cloud.

Q: Our organization is not ready for DevOps. Can we still use GitOps?

A: Yes, you can use GitOps at any stage of your DevOps journey. GitOps is a flexible and adaptable approach that can be tailored to fit your specific needs. It does not require any particular tools or techniques, so it is easy to adopt even if you are not yet doing DevOps.

Q: I am a developer. What do I need to know about GitOps?

A: As a developer, you need to know how to use Git. Git is the source of truth for GitOps, so you will need to be familiar with its commands and features. You should also be familiar with the basics of Kubernetes, as Kubernetes is the primary platform for GitOps deployments.

Q: I don’t use Kubernetes. Can I use GitOps?

A: Yes, you can use GitOps with any platform or tool. GitOps is flexible and can be tailored to fit your specific needs. You can continue to use your favorite tools and techniques while using Git to manage changes and automate deployments. Any infrastructure that can be monitored and defined declaratively and has Infrastructure as Code tools available can be used in principle. However, most pull-based GitOps operators are presently built with Kubernetes in mind.

Q: DevOps Vs. GitOps: What’s the Difference?

A: DevOps is a culture, a way of thinking, and a set of practices that help organizations deliver software faster and more securely. GitOps is a DevOps methodology that uses Git to manage changes and automate deployments. GitOps builds on the principles of DevOps and adds the advantage of using code to define the Infrastructure. It helps ensure that the Infrastructure is always in a known state and makes it easier to manage and replicate.

Q: What is a significant disadvantage of GitOps?

A: The primary disadvantage of GitOps is that it requires a robust and mature Git infrastructure. It cannot be easy to achieve in organizations that are not yet doing DevOps. However, as GitOps adoption grows, this Infrastructure will become more common. Another disadvantage (not a disadvantage, but it’s a perception) is that employees who are not used to DevOps practices who are adept at manually changing Infrastructure found the gitops process to be quite long, requiring them to go through many hoops to resolve a minor issue.

GitOps Tools

There are a few different tools that you can use to help manage your GitOps workflow. These tools will help you automate the process of provisioning, configuring, and deploying your system.

Flux CD: Flux CD is a tool that helps you automate your deployments. You can use FluxCD to manage both Kubernetes and non-Kubernetes resources.

Argo CD: Argo CD is a tool that helps you automate the deployment of applications to Kubernetes.

Jenkins X : Jenkins X is a tool you can use for Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery (CI/CD). It also has support for GitOps.

RedHat Gitops : Red Hat offers a tool called “Red Hat Gitops,” a set of tools and services (including Argocd) that help you manage your deployments.

These are just a few of the many tools you can use to help your GitOps workflow. In our demo, we will be using the Redhat Gitops product. However, feel free to experiment with another tooling to see what works best for you.

Let’s go through each tool in further detail,

Introduction of Flux CD?

Flux CD is a Gitops tool that helps you manage your deployments. It is an open-source and flexible collection of continuous and progressive delivery solutions for Kubernetes. Flux makes it easy to roll out changes and keep track of what’s been deployed. It also has built-in support for monitoring and logging, so you can easily track down any errors.

How does Flux CD work?

Flux CD has a few different components:

The first part is the Flux CLI, in which you interact with your Kubernetes clusters. You can use the CLI to create new deployments, roll out changes, etc.

The second part is the Flux Engine. The engine is responsible for monitoring your Kubernetes clusters and triggering deployments based on the configured rules.

The third part is the Flux UI. The UI provides a graphical interface for managing your deployments. You can use it to see what’s been deployed, get information about failed deployments, etc.

Some of the features of Flux CD are:

  • GitOps for both apps and Infrastructure: Flux supports application deployments and infrastructure changes, making it a versatile tool. You don’t need to worry about managing deployments. You simply push your changes to Git, and Flux takes care of the rest. It helps to ensure that your applications are always up-to-date and running smoothly.
  • Monitoring and logging: Flux has built-in support for monitoring and logging, so you can easily track down any errors.
  • Rollouts: Flux makes it easy to roll out changes and keep track of what’s been deployed. Flux can automatically roll out changes based on the configured rules. It helps to ensure that your applications are always up-to-date and running smoothly.
  • Flux UI: The Flux UI provides a graphical interface for managing your deployments. You can use it to see what’s been deployed, get information about failed deployments, etc.
  • Multi-Tenancy Support: Flux supports multi-tenancy, so you can quickly deploy applications and infrastructure changes across multiple clusters. Flux can manage apps in the same or other Kubernetes clusters, spin up more clusters, and manage clusters, including lifetime and fleets, all from a single Kubernetes cluster. Flux supports multiple Git repositories and leverages full Kubernetes RBAC through impersonation.
  • Alert and Notification: Monitoring is critical; Flux performs health checks, sends alerts to external systems, and handles external events when things go wrong. With Flux, you can configure Slack and email notifications to get alerted when there are problems with your deployments.
  • Flux is designed with security in mind: Flux has many features that help ensure the security of your deployments. These include role-based access control, authentication and authorization, and more.

Limitations of FluxCD?

No tool is perfect, and Flux CD is no exception. Some of the limitations of Flux CD include:

  • FluxCD is currently only available for Kubernetes. While Flux does support other container orchestration systems, such as Docker Swarm and Apache Mesos, the features may not be as extensive.
  • FluxCD supports syncing and updating from only one single repository. This constraint can be circumvented by having multiple instances of FluxCD in the cluster.

Despite these limitations, Flux CD is still one of the most popular Gitops tools available. It has a wide range of features, and its developers are constantly working to improve it. If you’re looking for a tool to help manage your deployments, Flux CD is definitely worth considering.

Introduction of ArgoCD?

ArgoCD is an open-source CD pipeline tool built on Git and Kubernetes. It is a tool that reads your environment configuration from your git repository and applies it to your Kubernetes namespaces (written as a helm chart, kustomize files, Jsonnet, or simple yaml files). Argo CD analyzes the status of the clusters and Git repositories continuously to detect any drift and may immediately restore the cluster to its desired condition if a change is seen in the Git repository or the cluster. It helps you automate the deployment of your applications and services across multiple environments, from development to production.

ArgoCD is popular with organizations that are moving to the cloud and Kubernetes.

Some of the features of Argo CD are:

  • Automated Deployment : ArgoCD helps you automate the deployment of your applications and services across multiple environments, from development to production. ArgoCD supports numerous Kubernetes clusters, which allows you to deploy your applications and services across various clusters.
  • Cloud and Kubernetes Friendly : ArgoCD is popular with organizations moving to the cloud and Kubernetes. It allows you to use all the features of Kubernetes to help you automate the deployment of your applications and services. ArgoCD is built on top of Git and Kubernetes, which means you can use all the power of these tools to help you automate the deployment of your applications and services.
  • Git-based Configuration and Webhook Support : ArgoCD reads your environment configuration from your git repository and applies it to your Kubernetes namespaces. It also supports webhooks via Github, BitBucket, and GitLab.
  • Automatic branch detection : ArgoCD automatically detects branches in your git repository and creates separate pipelines for each branch.
  • Parallel execution of tasks : ArgoCD parallelizes the execution of tasks, which helps you reduce the time it takes to deploy your applications and services.
  • Elegant Web UI And well define API : ArgoCD has a web UI that allows you to monitor the status of your deployments and pipelines. It has an API that will enable you to manage your deployments and pipelines programmatically.
  • Pipelines as code : ArgoCD allows you to write your pipelines as code, making it easy to version control and share them with others.
  • Support for the helm, customize, and Jsonnet : ArgoCD supports the helm, customize, and Jsonnet application declarations, which allows you to use the power of these tools to help you automate the deployment of your applications and services.
  • Easy integration with cloud providers and popular services like GitHub, Jenkins, Artifactory : ArgoCD is easy to integrate with cloud providers and popular services like GitHub, Jenkins, Artifactory, which allows you to use the power of these tools to help you automate the deployment of your applications and services.
  • Observability And Security : ArgoCD provides observability for your deployments and pipelines, which helps you troubleshoot and debug problems with your applications and services. Users can quickly determine whether the current state of the application corresponds to the desired state. Argo CD has a user interface (UI) and command-line interface (CLI) for fast inspecting the program and identifying variations between the expected and existing live states. Argo CD’s auto-healing features improve the CD workflow’s security by preventing unwanted, unapproved, or unvetted modifications from being made directly on the cluster accidentally or through security breaches.
  • SSO Support : GitHub, GitLab, Microsoft, LinkedIn, OAuth2, SAML 2.0, LDAP, and OIDC are among the SSO providers supported by ArgoCD.

Limitations of ArgoCD

ArgoCD is not a silver bullet and has some limitations:

  • Limited to Git and Kubernetes: ArgoCD is built on top of Git and Kubernetes, which means you can use all the power of these tools to help you automate the deployment of your applications and services. However, if you are not using Git and Kubernetes, you will not be able to use ArgoCD.

Introduction of Jenkins X?

Jenkins X is an open-source project for cloud-native applications that brings Jenkins and Kubernetes together. It helps you automate the deployment of your applications and services across multiple environments, from development to production. Jenkins X is built on top of Git, Kubernetes, and Helm, which means you can use all the power of these tools to help you automate the deployment of your applications and services. Jenkins X also provides observability for your deployments and pipelines, enabling you to troubleshoot and debug problems with your applications and services.

Jenkins X is an integral part of the Jenkins community. It allows you to use Jenkins to help you automate the deployment of your applications and services. Jenkins X is also easy to integrate with cloud providers and popular services like GitHub, Artifactory, AWS, Google Cloud, IBM Cloud, Microsoft Azure, Red Hat OpenShift, and Pivotal, which allows you to use the power of these tools to help you automate the deployment of your applications and services.

Some of the features/benefits of Jenkins X are:

  • Setup is simple: Jenkins X is easy to set up. You can get started in minutes by following the instructions on the Jenkins X website.
  • Cloud-native: Jenkins X is built for cloud-native applications. It helps you automate the deployment of your applications and services across multiple environments, from development to production.
  • Isolation: Jenkins X provides isolation for your applications and services. It helps you avoid problems when deploying various applications and services simultaneously.
  • Pipeline as code: Jenkins X allows you to write your pipelines as code, making it easy to version control and share them with others.
  • Observability: Jenkins X provides observability for your deployments and pipelines, which helps you troubleshoot and debug problems with your applications and services.
  • Integration: Jenkins X is easy to integrate with cloud providers and popular services like GitHub, Artifactory, AWS, Google Cloud, IBM Cloud, Microsoft Azure, Red Hat OpenShift, and Pivotal, which allows you to use the power of these tools to help you automate the deployment of your applications and services.
  • Preview Environments: You may use Jenkins X to create preview environments for your apps and services. It makes it easier to test them before putting them into production. Jenkins X automatically creates Preview Environments for your Pull Requests, allowing you to obtain quick feedback before the changes are merged to the main branch.
  • ChatOps: When your code is ready to be reviewed, promoted to environments, or if Pull Requests are produced automatically to upgrade versions, Jenkins X automatically comments on it. ChatOps support lets you use chat apps like Slack and HipChat to communicate with your pipelines and deployments.
  • Secret Management : Jenkins X has out-of-the-box secret integration for Vault, Google Secrets Manager, and other services.

Limitations of Jenkins X

There are some limitations to Jenkins X:

  • Only for Kubernetes : Jenkins X is explicitly built for Kubernetes and may not work with other platforms.
  • Requires Cluster-Admin Level Access to Kubernetes cluster : To define and manage Kubernetes resources, Jenkins X requires cluster-admin access.
  • Not suitable for legacy applications : Jenkins X is not eligible for legacy applications that need to be deployed on physical servers.
  • Pipelines only : Jenkins X provides pipelines only and does not include other features like job graphs or build reports.

In conclusion, Jenkins X is a powerful tool that can help you automate the deployment of your applications and services. It is easy to set up and integrate with cloud providers and popular services and provides observability for your deployments and pipelines. It also allows you to write your pipelines as code, making it easy to version control and share them with others.

Introduction of Redhat Gitops?

Red Hat Gitops is a methodology for using Git and Openshift to manage your applications and services. Red Hat GitOps is built around open-source projects such as ArgoCD as the declarative GitOps engine and Tekton Pipelines to create a GitOps framework. Red Hat GitOps enables GitOps workflows across multicluster OpenShift and Kubernetes Infrastructure.

Red Hat Gitops provides the following benefits:

  • Simplicity: Red Hat Gitops is simple to use. You manage your applications and services by defining their desired state in Git and then letting Kubernetes automatically control the deployment and orchestration of your applications and services to maintain that desired state. Red Hat Gitops eliminates the need to learn complex tooling or APIs.
  • Log aggregation in the OpenShift Logging central log management: By integrating with OpenShift Logging, Red Hat Gitops provides log aggregation for your applications and services, so you can quickly troubleshoot and debug problems.
  • Orchestration: Red Hat Gitops automates the orchestration of your applications and services across multiple environments, from development to production. Red Hat Gitops helps you avoid problems when deploying various applications and services simultaneously.
  • Versioning and rollback: Red Hat Gitops enables you to version your applications and services and supports rolling back to previous versions if necessary.
  • Pipeline as code: Red Hat Gitops allows you to write your pipelines as code using Tekton Pipelines, which makes it easy to version control and share them with others.
  • Declarative management: Red Hat Gitops uses a declarative approach to management, which helps you avoid problems caused by misconfiguration.
  • Infrastructure as code: Red Hat Gitops enables you to manage your OpenShift and Kubernetes Infrastructure as code, making it easy to version control and share with others. Red Hat Gitops can easily integrate with the Red Hat Advanced Management cluster, a commercially supported multicluster management tool for OpenShift.
  • Authentication integration guidance with Red Hat SSO and OpenShift: Gitops provides authentication integration guidance with Red Hat SSO and OpenShift, making it easy to manage your applications and services single sign-on.
  • Dynamic generation of Argo CD Applications with ApplicationSets (Tech Preview): Red Hat Gitops can dynamically generate Argo CD applications and their associated deployment configs from a Git repository. It enables you to manage your applications and services efficiently.
  • Collection of Argo CD metrics through the OpenShift monitoring stack Prometheus: Red Hat Gitops can collect Argo CD metrics through the OpenShift monitoring stack using Prometheus, which provides you with a single pane of glass for monitoring your applications and services.
  • OutOfSync alerts in OpenShift monitoring stack AlertManager: Red Hat Gitops can generate alerts in the OpenShift monitoring stack AlertManager when your applications and services are out of sync with their desired state in Git.

Limitations of RedHat Gitops?

Red Hat Gitops is a new product based on ArgoCD for continuous deployment and Tekton Pipeline for Continuous Integration. All limitation applicable for ArgoCD and Tekton is also applicable for RedHat Gitops. RedHat Gitops is designed explicitly around the Openshift ecosystem. As a result, most instructions and examples are written with Openshift in mind. The goal is to provide business-grade gitops solutions based on open source projects to help enterprise clients. So may not be suitable for vanilla Kubernetes.

FluxCD vs. ArgoCD vs. Jenkins X vs. RedHat Gitops

All four projects, FluxCD, ArgoCD, Jenkins X, and RedHat Gitops, offer extremely intriguing and robust features for managing Kubernetes/Openshift deployments using GitOps, but each has merits and downsides that should be considered for your situation.

Flux is a lightweight and straightforward GitOps-based deployment component that will most likely compliment your current configuration. Flux might be a solution for you if your company uses the Mono repository to manage its Infrastructure. The most excellent part about FluxCD is that changes are bidirectional. By bidirectional, if you make changes on the cluster, it will sync those changes to Git and vice versa, making sure your git repository is a single source of truth. It simply requires access to one Git repository, and it may run with restricted RBAC permission.

ArgoCD can handle multiple application deployments with multiple repositories on numerous clusters. It maintains access and permissions for teams and projects in the cluster. It includes a robust collection of tools for managing deployments and has an elegant web interface and powerful API for managing apps and projects. Many companies are creating CD frameworks around ArgoCD, which is by far the fastest-growing gitops project.

Jenkins X combines a well-selected set of technologies to construct a development workflow based on Git repositories. Jenkins X support Terraform to manage Cloud Infrastructure, Supports HashisCorp Vault, Google Secrets Manager, and other services for external secret management. It also allows complex interactions in pull requests and performs continuous integration pipelines to create and run application tests. ArgoCD and Tekton integration for pipeline orchestration are now available in Jenkins X version 3!

RedHat GitOPS is all based on ArgoCD and Tekton Pipeline. RedHat Gitops uses an operator approach to install these components. RedHat GitOps is built around the OpenShift ecosystem, so if you are using Openshift, this is the no-brainer solution to select among other gitops solutions. The integration is slick, and you can manage RedHat Gitops using the Openshift console. You can also integrate RedHat Gitops using RedHat Advanced Cluster Management (RHACM) Solutions, a multicluster management solution. RHACM gives enterprises the visibility, governance, and control to scale and manage containerized environments.

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